Gote Shibari 後手 縛り

Gote Shibari (also sometimes referred to as “Takate Kote Shibari”) means hands behind the back tie and generally refers to one of the many variations of what is often referred to as a box tie in the west. The Ushiro Takate Kote Shibari is essentially a different name for the same tie however those teachers that come from the Akechi Denki school of Shibari such as Osada Steve and Hajime Kinoko tend to use this term. Ushiru Takate Kote means “Behind the back , high hand, small hand” which can be taken two ways, in one school including Arisue Go it is taken to mean the small of the hand ie the wrist up high behind the back, while in the Akechi Denki school is is taken to mean the wrist and the high hand or upper arm tied behind the back. So there is some ambiguity.

I’m going to preface this with the following.

  • Every rope artist I have seen or trained with does this differently
  • Although there is no right way there are definitely a few wrong ways

Gote Shibari 後手縛り(hands in back tie) is a common tie that forms the basis of a lot of Kinbaku 緊縛 (sexual bondage), both floor work and suspension. It is also the tie that seems to cause the most trouble for people getting to know Japanese rope art. Due mainly to the issues associated with tying the arms, including nerve compression and circulatory reduction, it is certainly the thing I have re-learned a number of times and still tends to be the area I have an issue with, if any.

 

There are a lot of good resources on the web relating to issues of nerve compression so I will briefly say the following.

The issues I have experienced have been caused by one of three areas, the upper arm and the wrists.

  • The outside of the upper arm has a delicate section, as seen in the image below. The radial nerve is exposed at the junction of the triceps and deltoid muscle groups. If rope is placed over this section the radial nerve can become compressed, which often presents “wrist drop” and tingling of the fingers as symptoms. To prevent this the upper and lower rope groups should be lined up with the centre of the Triceps and deltoids respectively, the rope bottom should be asked to lift their wrists a few times while being tied and any tingling should be addressed.
  • Nerve compression can also occur under the armpit if the top wraps are quite high and the kanukki either is to tight or tightens during suspension, the radial nerve can again be compressed. Kanukki need to remain very lightly tensioned with no deformation of the top horisontal lines.
  • Anotherr area that has caused problems in the past is the wrist. ,The inside of the wrists are an aggregation point in the body for nerves and blood vessels. Compression in this area tends to lead to tingling and cooling of the fingers. This should be checked for regularly during play and largely mitigated by placing the wrists facing one another while tied.